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What is M Apk Tool and How to Use it for Android App Development and Modding



A tool for reverse engineering 3rd party, closed, binary Android apps. It can decode resources to nearly original form and rebuild them after making some modifications. It also makes working with an app easier because of the project like file structure and automation of some repetitive tasks like building apk, etc.




m apk tool



A tool for reverse engineering 3rd party, closed, binary Android apps. It candecode resources to nearly original form and rebuild them after making somemodifications; it makes possible to debug smali code step by step. Also itmakes working with an app easier because of project-like file structure andautomation of some repetitive tasks like building apk.


I've decoded an APK with apktool (as the original source code was lost) so I could fix some issues with the layout xml files. I've then rebuilt it back up with apktool and when I tried to install it on my device (using adb: adb install appname.apk) it gave me this error:


Android 7.0 introduces APK Signature Scheme v2, a new app-signing scheme that offers faster app install times and more protection against unauthorized alterations to APK files (See here and here for more details). Therefore, Google implemented their own apk signer called apksigner (duh!)The script file can be found in %ANDROID_HOME%/sdk/build-tools/24.0.3/ (the .jar is in the /lib subfolder). Use it like this


For those of you who don't want to create a bat file to edit for every project, or dont want to remember all the commands associated with the keytools and jarsigner programs and just want to get it done in one process use this program:


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This is from the apktools official website. Because it needs aapt, it seems quite hard to use apktools in an Android app. But if you can get the source code and compiled in an aosp environment, it could possibly make it run on the Android side.


Apktool M allows you to modify existing Android application installation packages (*.apk) or create new ones from scratch. Antisplit is a tool for installing and extracting Android App Bundle (split) files, as well as combining them back into a single file.


Apktool M is a programme that can be used to decipher the binary code of third-party Android applications that have been locked down. It allows for step-by-step debugging of smali code by decoding resources to near-original form and rebuilding them with alterations.


Good uses include localization, extending functionality, and supporting non-standard systems. Please be kind to the developers of the software you like using. Apktool M allows you to modify existing Android application installation packages (*.apk) or create new ones from scratch.


A multi-purpose file organiser that is easy to use. The ability to work with a variety of installation file formats, including *.apk, *.apks, *.xapk, and *.apkm. Antisplit is a tool for installing and extracting Android App Bundle (split) files, as well as combining them back into a single file.


Make a unique signature to use while filling out forms. Altering the name, package name (cloning the programme), icon, and other attributes of an application in a flash and without a rebuild. A root privilege is not necessary. The Apktool M costs nothing to download, works with smartphones running Android 4.0 or later, and does not track user data or display advertisements.


ClassyShark is a standalone binary inspection tool for Android developers. It can reliably browse any Android executable and show important info such as class interfaces and members, dex counts and dependencies. ClassyShark supports multiple formats including libraries (.dex, .aar, .so), executables (.apk, .jar, .class) and all Android binary XMLs: AndroidManifest, resources, layouts etc.


There is an online tool that lets you upload an APK It decompiles it and finally lets you to download a zip with all sources, manifest XML file and so on decompiled, all of that without having to install any program on your computer:


I started my exploration from there. I used the output of JADX to explore where this parameter was being populated. This is where having the decompiled source code was really useful. The file structure in the apktool output and jadx output is the same so we can explore the output of JADX to help us figure out where to insert the debug statements in smali.


zipalign is an archive alignment tool that provides important optimization to Android application (APK) files. The purpose is to ensure that all uncompressed data starts with a particular alignment relative to the start of the file.


Last release (2.3.4) promised official support for select Android devices. I went back on this decision and turned down the merge request to bring in official Android support for Apktool. It's no secret that my AOSP knowledge (especially C++) is not good, this means taking a feature and making sure it survives is more of a challenge for me. Pairing this with the difficult and ever evolving feature of running binaries on Android, led me to ultimately turning down this feature.


On the front of aapt, we have an exciting announcement that Apktool is now fully tested on each commit on all three major operating systems - (Unix, Windows and Mac). Since we bundle aapt and appt2 in the Apktool binary, we need to ensure that those binaries work. We've unforunately regressed in Windows multiple times throughout the history of this tool and this change will hopefully prevent that from happening going forward.


If you merely want to understand the code, there's lots of options. For example, you could use Enjarify or dex2jar to translate it to a jar file and then use any Java bytecode tools or decompilers. There's also a few decompilers with native Android support.


GDA: supports APK, DEX, ODEX and OAT files. A Dalvik bytecode decompiler was written entirely in c++. So, unlike most app analysis tools, GDA does not need to rely on the Java platform, And as the use of the Bytecode directly translated into Java code without Smali code translation. So it is more succinct, more portable and faster.


ApkTool is a tool for reverse engineering 3rd party, closed, binary Android apps. It can decode resources to nearly original form and rebuild them after making some modifications; it makes possible to debug smali code step by step. Also it makes working with app easier because of project-like files structure and automation of some repetitive tasks like building APK, etc.JRE 1.7 (Java Runtime Environment) is required.


In this article, we will look at various techniques being used by the developers and ways to bypass these root detection techniques for android applications. Nowadays many applications such as financial, banking, payment wallet applications do not work on the rooted device. Pentesting requires root permission to install various tools to compromise the security of the application and it is very painful job for any pen tester if app does not work on the rooted device that restricts the tester from performing various test cases.


Now, we will reverse engineer the application by decompiling the APK file to verify which techniques application is utilizing for root access detection. Here, we will use the dex2jar tool to decompile the APK file and get the java code.


We got the decompiled version of the APK file, i.e., sample_dex2jar.jar file. We will now use JD-GUI tool to read the jar file and understand the root detection logic used in the application.


Here, we will be using Apktool to decompile the APK, Apktool is a used for reverse engineering 3rd party, closed, binary Android apps. It can decode resources to nearly original form and rebuild them after making some modifications; it makes possible to debug smali code step by step. Read more about Apktool here.


Apktool has converted Dalvik Executable (dex) into smali code illustrated up above. Earlier we have identified two class files which has the root detection logic, we will quickly go to the smali folder and open those files (m.smali and ah.smali) with Notepad++ utility (more about Notepad++). Illustration below


version 2.15 works better for my android and is easy, the last version present some layout problems and tools are more hidden. Ok my english is not good. I updated from version 2.15 to 6.5 and it has ...


You need to have at least the Android tools and SDK, but for most people I would recommend to just install Android Studio and follow the instructions to set it up as normal (but skip stuff like the SDK for Android TV and other stuff that will slow down your download).


I figured out that there is no keystore , so we have to make one.I searched through Internet and i found this site that helped me: -to-sign-an-already-compiled-apki used the following commands to make a keystore and use that to sign the apk:create a key :keytool -genkey -v -keystore my-release-key.keystore -alias alias_name -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -validity 10000___then use the key to sign the apk:


You can do such a thing using a preferred IDE as well (like Android Studio, Eclips, IntelIiJ IDEA, ect.) but for that you need basic programming knowledge and doing the same will need some time also for generating a new apk with new package name. But you can do the same without any programming knowledge and with minimal time using apktool.


The three Arabidopsis MAPKs -MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6-, or their homologs in other species, have been identified decades ago as strongly activated by various stresses and have been extensively characterized since. The power of genetic tools developed in Arabidopsis strongly contributed to these studies. But the main step forward comes from the identification the first PAMP (Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern) flg22, a peptide derived from flagellum of the biotrophic pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas sp., which is specifically recognized by plants as alarm signal and is a potent MAPK activator (Felix et al., 1999; Gomez-gomez and Boller, 2000; Droillard et al., 2004). In Arabidopsis, flg22 activates two functional MAPK modules: the first one is defined by MAPKKK3/5-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 and the second one by MEKK1-MKK1/2-MPK4 (Colcombet and Hirt, 2008; Suarez-Rodriguez et al., 2010; Bi et al., 2018). Beside PTI (PAMP-Triggered Immunity), MKK4/5-MPK3/6 is also activated in ETI signaling. Tsuda et al. (2013) reported the module activation upon detection of the Pseudomonas effector avrRPT2 by the NBS-LRR cytosolic receptor RPS2. Interestingly, activation kinetics differ largely in both cases, being rapid and transient (less than 30 min) in the case of PTI and slow and sustained (several hours) in the case of ETI. Kinases belonging to the two flg22-activated MAPK modules have been also shown to be activated upon abiotic stresses or nutritional deprivation (Ichimura et al., 2000; Teige et al., 2004; Chardin et al., 2017). Similarly, MAPK activations can be rapid and transient such as in the perception of wounding or slower and sustained. Finally, MPK3/4/6 have important functions in developmental processes. For example, MPK3/6, together with MKK4/5 and the MAP3K YODA are involved, among others, in stomatal patterning and organ abscission (Wang et al., 2007; Cho et al., 2008). Downstream of MKK7, MPK6 plays a role in shoot branching (Jia et al., 2016). MPK4, acting downstream of MKK6 (also known as ANQ) and MAP3K1/2/12 (also known as ANP1/2/3), has an important role in cytokinesis (Kosetsu et al., 2010).


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