top of page

Catholic Daily Quotes

Public·311 members

How a Gold Coin Saved a Confederate Soldier and Became a Legend: The Story of the H. L. Hunley and Queenie's Coin


# The Story Of The H. L. Hunley And Queenie's Coin - Introduction - Brief overview of the H. L. Hunley, the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in the American Civil War - Mention the mystery of its disappearance and recovery - Introduce the legend of Queenie's coin, a gold piece that supposedly saved the life of one of the crew members - The Design And Construction Of The H. L. Hunley - Describe the features and specifications of the submarine - Explain the challenges and risks involved in operating it - Name the inventor and the financier of the project - The Three Sinkings And The Final Mission Of The H. L. Hunley - Narrate the events of the first two sinkings, which killed several crew members, including Hunley himself - Describe the successful attack on the USS Housatonic, which made history - Speculate on the possible causes of the third sinking, which claimed all eight lives on board - The Discovery And Preservation Of The H. L. Hunley - Explain how and when the submarine was located and raised from the sea floor - Describe the conservation efforts and research conducted on the vessel and its contents - Highlight some of the artifacts and findings that shed light on its history and mystery - The Legend Of Queenie's Coin - Introduce Queenie Bennett, a young woman who was engaged to Lieutenant George Dixon, the commander of the Hunley - Tell the story of how she gave him a gold coin as a token of love and luck before he left for war - Reveal how the coin was found among Dixon's remains, with a dent from a bullet that he survived at the Battle of Shiloh - Discuss the significance and symbolism of the coin for Dixon and for the Hunley's legacy - Conclusion - Summarize the main points of the article - Emphasize the historical and cultural importance of the H. L. Hunley and Queenie's coin - End with a catchy or memorable sentence Here is the article based on that outline: # The Story Of The H. L. Hunley And Queenie's Coin The American Civil War was a time of innovation and experimentation in warfare, as both sides tried to gain an edge over their enemies. One of the most remarkable inventions of that era was the H. L. Hunley, a submarine that made history by sinking an enemy ship in combat. But along with its fame came tragedy, as it also sank three times with its crew, leaving behind a mystery that lasted for more than a century. Among the many secrets that were uncovered when it was finally recovered from the ocean floor was a gold coin that had a remarkable story of its own: a story of love, luck, and survival. ## The Design And Construction Of The H. L. Hunley The H. L. Hunley was not the first submarine ever built, but it was certainly one of the most ambitious and daring ones. It was designed and built at Mobile, Alabama, by James McClintock and Baxter Watson, two engineers who had previously worked on steamboats and railroads. They were financed by Horace Lawson Hunley, a wealthy lawyer and businessman who had a keen interest in naval warfare. The submarine was made out of 40 feet of bulletproof iron, shaped like a cigar with tapered ends. It had a hand-cranked propeller that could propel it at a speed of about 4 knots (7 km/h) on the surface and 2 knots (4 km/h) underwater. It could hold up to nine crewmen, most of whom had to crank the propeller while lying on their backs on wooden benches. The commander controlled the steering and depth by using levers and pedals that operated rudders and ballast tanks. The submarine had no engine or battery, so it relied on human power and air supply for its operation. It had no periscope or sonar, so it had to surface periodically to check its position and target. It had no torpedo tubes or guns, so it carried a single spar torpedo: a copper cylinder filled with gunpowder attached to a long pole at its bow. To attack an enemy ship, it had to ram it with the torpedo and then detach it with a rope before it exploded. Operating such a submarine was a risky and challenging task, as the crew had to endure cramped and dark conditions, limited oxygen, and constant danger of sinking, drowning, or exploding. But the men who volunteered for the mission were motivated by patriotism, courage, and the hope of breaking the Union blockade that was strangling the Confederate economy. ## The Three Sinkings And The Final Mission Of The H. L. Hunley The H. L. Hunley was shipped by rail to Charleston, South Carolina, in August 1863, where it was launched in July. It was then referred to as the "fish boat", the "fish torpedo boat", or the "porpoise". It underwent several trials and tests in the harbor, but it also suffered several accidents and mishaps that cost many lives. The first sinking occurred on August 29, 1863, during a test run. The submarine was being towed by a steamboat when it suddenly plunged to the bottom of the harbor, killing five of its crew. It was later raised and repaired, and a new crew was recruited. The second sinking happened on October 15, 1863, during another test run. The submarine was submerged near the dock when it failed to resurface, killing all eight of its crew, including Hunley himself, who had decided to join the expedition. It was again raised and restored, and another crew was assembled. The third and final sinking took place on February 17, 1864, during the submarine's only combat mission. The target was the USS Housatonic, a 1,240-ton sloop-of-war that was part of the Union blockade fleet. The Hunley managed to sneak up on the Housatonic at night and ram it with its spar torpedo, which detonated and ripped a hole in the ship's hull. The Housatonic sank within minutes, becoming the first warship in history to be sunk by a submarine. The Hunley, however, did not survive the attack either. It signaled to its support boat on shore that it had completed its mission and started to return to base. But something went wrong along the way, and it never made it back. It sank for the third and last time, taking with it all eight of its crew. The exact cause of the Hunley's demise remains a mystery to this day. Some possible explanations include damage from the explosion of its own torpedo, collision with another ship or obstacle, mechanical failure, human error, or enemy fire. Whatever it was, it sealed the fate of the submarine and its crew for more than a century. ## The Discovery And Preservation Of The H. L. Hunley The H. L. Hunley lay in only 30 feet (9 meters) of water some 4 miles (6 km) offshore from Charleston until it was found by preservationists in 1995. It was located by a team of divers led by novelist Clive Cussler, who had been searching for it for more than a decade. It was then raised intact in 2000 and taken to North Charleston's Warren Lasch Conservation Center, where it underwent extensive preservation work and research. The submarine and its contents were carefully examined and documented by experts from various fields of science and history. They found many artifacts and clues that shed light on its design, operation, mission, and mystery. They also recovered the remains of its crew members, who were still at their posts when they died. They were identified by their names, ranks, ages, physical features, personal belongings, and DNA analysis. Some of the most remarkable discoveries made by the researchers include: - The submarine was much more sophisticated and advanced than previously thought. It had a complex system of valves, pumps, pipes, gauges, and tanks that controlled its buoyancy and maneuverability. It also had a ventilation system that allowed fresh air to circulate inside while submerged. - The submarine had a unique way of communicating with its support boat on shore. It used a blue light signal that could be seen from a distance at night. The light was produced by burning calcium carbide in a metal container called a calcium light or limelight. - The submarine had a clever way of navigating underwater without a compass or a periscope. It used a candle attached to a float that could be raised or lowered through a tube in the ceiling. The candle cast a shadow on a paper dial that indicated the direction of the submarine's heading. - The submarine had a tragic way of ending its final mission. According to forensic evidence, the crew members died instantly or shortly after the explosion of their own torpedo. The blast wave created by the detonation caused fatal injuries to their lungs and brains, known as blast lung or blast injury. ## The Legend Of Queenie's Coin Among the many artifacts and mysteries that were found inside the H. L. Hunley, one of the most fascinating and touching ones was a gold coin that belonged to its commander, Lieutenant George Dixon. The coin had a remarkable story of its own: a story of love, luck, and survival. The coin was an 1860-minted $20 gold piece that featured the image of Lady Liberty on one side and an eagle on the other. It was given to Dixon by his sweetheart, Queenie Bennett, a young woman from Mobile, Alabama, who was engaged to him before he left for war. Queenie instructed Dixon to keep the coin with him at all times as a token of her love and as a charm for good luck. Dixon did just that, and it proved to be a wise decision. The coin saved his life at the Battle of Shiloh in April 1862, when he was shot in the left leg by a Union soldier at close range. The bullet hit the coin in his pocket and ricocheted off, leaving a large dent on its surface. Dixon survived the wound, but he suffered a permanent limp for the rest of his life. After the battle, Dixon had the coin inscribed with a message that commemorated his miraculous escape. The obverse side still showed Lady Liberty, but the reverse side read: Shiloh April 6 1862 My Life Preserver G. E. D. Dixon carried the coin with him for the next two years, until his final mission on the H. L. Hunley. The coin was found among his remains when the submarine was recovered in 2000. It was still in good condition, despite being exposed to salt water and corrosion for more than a century. The coin is now on display at the Warren Lasch Conservation Center, where it serves as a symbol of the love and courage that motivated Dixon and his crew to risk their lives for their cause. It also serves as a reminder of the human side of war, and of the personal stories that lie behind every historical event. ## Conclusion The H. L. Hunley and Queenie's coin are two remarkable pieces of history that tell us a lot about the American Civil War and its impact on the people who lived through it. They show us how innovation and experimentation in warfare can lead to both success and tragedy, and how love and luck can make a difference between life and death. They also show us how history can be preserved and revealed through careful research and conservation efforts, and how artifacts and mysteries can spark our curiosity and imagination for generations to come. The H. L. Hunley and Queenie's coin are more than just metal objects; they are stories that connect us with our past and inspire us for our future. ## FAQs - Q: When was the H. L. Hunley built and launched? - A: The H. L. Hunley was built at Mobile, Alabama, in early 1863 and launched in July 1863. - Q: How did the H. L. Hunley sink an enemy ship? - A: The H. L. Hunley used a spar torpedo, which was a copper cylinder filled with gunpowder attached to a long pole at its bow. It rammed the torpedo into the hull of the enemy ship and then detached it with a rope before it exploded. - Q: Who was Queenie Bennett? - A: Queenie Bennett was a young woman from Mobile, Alabama, who was engaged to Lieutenant George Dixon, the commander of the H. L. Hunley. She gave him a gold coin as a token of love and luck before he left for war. - Q: How did Queenie's coin save Dixon's life? - A: Queenie's coin saved Dixon's life at the Battle of Shiloh in April 1862, when he was shot in the left leg by a Union soldier at close range. The bullet hit the coin in his pocket and ricocheted off, leaving a large dent on its surface. - Q: Where are the H. L. Hunley and Queenie's coin now? - A: The H. L. Hunley and Queenie's coin are now on display at the Warren Lasch Conservation Center in North Charleston, South Carolina.




The Story Of The H. L. Hunley And Queenie's Coin Download

71b2f0854b


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
bottom of page