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Eddie Dean Solo


This two-disc import set contains over three dozen tracks spanning Diana Ross' contributions as both a member of the Supremes and a solo artist. While CD racks are replete with compilations featuring the seminal Motown diva, Ultimate Diana (1999) seemingly bests a majority of these, not only on the strength of the tune stack, but also as a primer to her entire three-plus decade career. As the title suggests, this collection successfully gathers major singles and even a few well-placed catalogue tracks -- such as the cover of the Beatles' "Hard Day's Night" (from the Supremes) and Sam Cooke's "You Send Me." Also included is one of the vocalists most memorable duets with Marvin Gaye on "My Mistake (Was To Love You)" from the highly recommended Diana & Marvin (1973) platter. However, the real selling point for both the casual and the well-season listener is a lengthy list of hits ranging from early tracks such as "You Can't Hurry Love" to the later sides "Upside Down," The "Boss" and the seminal soundtrack inclusions "It's My Turn" and "Endless Love" -- the latter of which also features vocals from Lionel Richie. Rather than gathering the material in a strictly chronological fashion, Ultimate Diana turns the tables by offering the material beginning with the most recent and journeying through the past. Thanks to the mid-to-late '90s remastering of Motown material, the sound presented on this collection is exceptional -- rivalling that of most domestic reissues from the same era. Granted this title does not definitively corral what many die-hard Ross enthusiasts might consider as essential. However, without reservation and as a thorough career overview, the two-plus hours of music included on this double disc set indeed feature the Ultimate Diana Ross.




Eddie Dean Solo


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In the classical arena, Collier has appeared as guest soloist with the Seattle Symphony, The Denver Symphony, The Bellevue Philharmonic, The Northwest Chamber Orchestra, The Everett Symphony and The Olympia Symphony. He was timpanist in the Los Angeles Repertoire Orchestra in 1976, vibraphonist in L.A. Contempo Four, 1975-77(a modern music ensemble), and timpanist with the Northwest Chamber Orchestra, 1972-73.


In addition to the above, he has recorded several educational albums for Music Minus One and Studio 4 Music and has presented over 300 jazz concerts in public schools around Washington State for the Arts In Education Program under the auspices of that state's Arts Commission. In 1980, Collier was presented with an "Outstanding Service To Jazz Education" award by the National Association of Jazz Educators, and over the past thirty years, he has won twenty five ASCAP Popular Panel and ASCAPlus Awards for his various jazz and percussion compositions. In 2011, the prestigious Adelaide D. Currie Cole Endowed Professorship in the University of Washington School of Music was awarded to Professor Collier for the academic years 2011-2013. In 2014, he was awarded a Royalty Research Grant by the University to produce three new recordings in three different settings including a solo vibraphone album, an experimental free improvisation trio album, and a recording of original jazz compositions for quintet featuring vibraphone and guitar.


In the trio that follows, Tai Jimenez is fresh and spirited asthat ballet staple, the girl who just can't stop dancing, supported andencouraged by two goofy swains played by Tyrone Brooks and Calvin ShawnLanders. Lisa Attles maintains an elegant, clean line as she is deftly thrownaround by Gregory Jackson, Dean Anderson and Lawrence de Maeyer. And EndalynTaylor-Shellman's strong solo performance is a high point of the ballet.


That solo makes plain the complex, skillful weave of music anddance in "Songs of Mahler," as does the closing pas de deux. Mr.Smuin ends the ballet on a suddenly hushed note that recalls, with the loamyrichness and skittering sweetness of Ms. Norman's singing, the fact thatin ancient times performing spaces were considered holy. In this dance for aByronic figure and his phantom lover, Christina Johnson stands out for themelting lyricism and eloquence of her dancing, qualities matched by the quietauthority of Donald Williams, her sensitive partner. 041b061a72


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